TESL/FL Resource Guide


NOTE: This is an older version. The most recent version has not been HTML-ized yet, but you can view the plain text FAQ.

Table of Contents
Part 1: Introduction: What is ESL/EFL/ESOL?
Part 2: Employment
Part 3: Internet Resources
Part 4: Books, Materials, and Publishers
Part 5: Professional Journals, Publications, Grant funding, software, Teacher Aids, etc.
Who is ESLTEACHER?


SUMMARY:


This posting describes the newsgroup misc.education.language.english, including where to find more information. It should be read by anyone who wishes to post to misc.education.language.english. It also contains information of interest to ESL/EFL/ESOL teachers and students world-wide. This version (2.0 Interim) was last modified 1996/01/20 and is posted monthly to the newsgroup misc.education.language.english. Copyright 1996, Meg Gam. HTML-ized by Kristina Harris.

The ESL/EFL/ESOL FAQ is also available on WWW (this document), and by anonymous ftp:

math.unr.edu in directory /users/kristina/mele-faq.txt

WELCOME TO MISC.EDUCATION.LANGUAGE ENGLISH: A NEWSGROUP FOR TEACHERS OF ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES

[WHAT IS THIS FAQ? | WHAT IS M.E.L.E? | TABLE OF CONTENTS ]


Many thanks to Mark Israel for his advice, help and support, as well as his permission to use information from his extremely informative FAQ for the newsgroup alt.usage.english .

Thus edition has been completely revised. Substantial modifications have been made to every section. If you have a copy dated before 1/20/96, you will find this edition to contain changes too numerous to list. The changes between this edition and the 1/20/96 edition are primarily in format.

WHAT IS THE ESL/EFL/ESOL FAQ?

This Frequently Asked Questions file (FAQ) has grown from about 20 questions/answers which kept popping up on the Usenet newsgroup, misc.education.language.english (m.e.l.e.). I've added questions I've kept answering on some other newsgroups and mailing lists, so that, while the original intent was, and still is, to produce a FAQ for m.e.l.e., the FAQ is now applicable to many ESL/EFL/ESOL interest groups, including individuals with no access to the Internet.

WHAT IS MISC.EDUCATION.LANGUAGE.ENGLISH?

m.e.l.e. is a newsgroup intended for discussion of issues in teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

  1. Please send suggestions/flames/praise to me by e-mail rather than post them to the newsgroup. The purpose of an FAQ file is to reduce traffic, not increase it.

  2. This is in no sense an "official" FAQ file. Feel free to start your own. I certainly can't stop you.

  3. Please don't expect me to add a topic unless (a) you're willing to contribute the entry for that topic; (b) *either* the topic has come up at least twice in the newsgroup, *or* the entry gives information that cannot readily be found elsewhere. Thanks to all who *have* contributed!


TABLE OF CONTENTS


What is ESL? What is EFL? What is ESOL?
Is there any difference between ESL and EFL?
What is TEFL? What is TESL?
What does one need to do to be an ESL teacher?
What is the RSA/CTEFL?
How does the RSA/CTEFL compare with the MA-TESL?
Where can one find out about C-TEFL programs available in the U.S.?
Where can one find out about MA-TESL programs?
What about other certificate programs?
What is the TOEFL? What are the Cambridge Exams? How do they compare?
Where can one find out about TESL/EFL/ESOL teaching jobs in other countries?
What about the Peace Corps?
What about other volunteer programs one can join to go abroad and teach English without experience?
What resources for ESL/FL teachers are available on the Internet?
Newsgroups
Mailing lists
WebSites
Telnet Sites
ESL MOO
Gopher Sites
Professional organizations for ESL/EFL/ESOL
Books for teaching ESL/FL
Grammar and TOEFL
All-purpose Books
Communications/Conversation/Activities Books
Basic Texts/Survival English
Culture Texts (US Culture)
ESL/EFL/ESOL Publishers and Distributors
Magazines and Journals for teachers of ESL/EFL/ESOL
Some Universities Offering MA-TESL programs
Universities and Training Centers Offering Distance MA-TESL and Post-Graduate Certificate and Diploma Courses

WELCOME TO MISC.EDUCATION.LANGUAGE.ENGLISH!


misc.language.education.english (m.e.l.e.) is a newsgroup where we can discuss topics of interest to teachers of English to speakers of other languages. We discuss different situations that come up and how to deal with them, teaching techniques for various topics/issues/subjects, classroom projects,games, and activities .

Things you might want to consider not posting on m.e.l.e.

  1. Questions that can be answered by simple reference to a dictionary.

  2. Generalities. If you make a statement like: "American English speakers ALWAYS say/do 'X thing'",, or "ALL British English speakers say/do 'Y thing'", or if you make country or culture-specific generalizations regarding TESL/EFL/ESOL, there's a strong likelihood that someone will come back at you with a counter-example.

  3. Assertions that one variety of English is "true English", or that one variety of what is commonly considered "native English" is better than any other..

  4. Sloppy writing (as distinct from simple slips like typing errors, or errors from someone whose native language is not English). Please keep in mind that the regulars on misc.education.language.english are probably less willing than the general population to suffer sloppy writers gladly; and that each article is written by one person, but read perhaps by thousands, so the convenience of the readers really ought to have priority over the convenience of the writer. Again, this is *not* to discourage non-native speakers from posting; readers will be able to detect that you're writing in a foreign language, and will make allowances for this.

  5. Expressions of exasperation. In the course of discussion, you may encounter positions based on premises radically different from yours and, perhaps, surprisingly novel to you. Saying things like "Oh, please", "That's absurd", or "Give me a break" is unlikely to win your opponent over.

RELATED NEWSGROUPS


There are other newsgroups which discuss the English language. Some of these might be more appropriate to your topic of discussion.
bit.listserv.words-l
(which is a redistribution of a BITNET mailing list -- not all machines on Usenet carry these) is billed as being for "English language discussion"..
sci.lang targets professional linguists.
Discussions tend to be about linguistic methodology (rather than about *particular* words and phrases), and prescription is severely frowned upon there.
bit.listserv.slart-l is a list for SLA research and teaching
alt.literacy.adult
a newsgroup for adults who are trying to to improve their reading and writing skills. Teachers and tutors are also welcome. Discussions often run to politics.
alt.education.research is a newsgroup about studying about studying
uk.education.misc
is a newsgroup of interest to those involved in education in the United Kingdom.
aus.education
this newsgroup addresses issues of interest to teachers in Australia.
alt.flame.spelling is the place to criticize other people's spelling.
We try to avoid doing that on m.e.l.e. (although some people do get annoyed if you spell language terms wrong. It's "consensus",not "concensus"; "diphthong", not "dipthong"; "grammar", not"grammer"; "guttural", not "gutteral"; and "pronunciation", not "pronounciation").
alt.usage.english
is a newsgroup where discussion is about the English language (and also occasionally other languages). Discussions are about how particular words, phrases, and syntactic forms are used; how they originated; and where in the English-speaking world they're prevalent. (All this is called "description".) Discussions also touch on how participants think they *should* be used ("prescription").
alt.usage.english.neologism
is described as being for "meaningless words coined by psychotics". Not many sites carry it, and it has had little traffic so far; the people who do post to it are more positive about neologisms than the quoted description would indicate.
misc.education.adult
is devoted to adult education issues.
k12.lang.art
is for K12 teachers of language arts
k12.chat.teacher
is for K12 teachers, in general.
k12.ed.art
Arts & crafts curriculum in K-12 education.
k12.ed.business
Business education curriculum in grades K-12.
k12.ed.comp.literacy
Teaching computer literacy in grades K-12.
rec.puzzles
is a better place than m.e.l.e. to ask questions like "What English words end in '-gry' or '-endous'?", "What words contain 'vv'?", "What words have 'e' pronounced as /I/?", "What Pig Latin words are also words?", or 'That that is is that that is not is not that that is not is not that that is is that it it is' to get comprehensible text?" But, before you post such a question there, make sure it's not answered in the rec.puzzles archive, available by anonymous ftp from rtfm.mit.edu; the relevant section is in the directory pub/usenet/news.answers/puzzles/archive/language.
alt.anagrams Wordplay for its own sake (anagrams, palindromes, etc.) belongs in alt.anagrams. There are also long lists of things of this sort in the rec.puzzles archive.
comp.edu.languages.natural
is devoted to software for assisting language instruction.
misc.writing
is a newsgroup devoted to writing, and especially to the concerns of people trying to establish themselves as professional writers.
alt.quotations
is the place to ask about origins of quotations, although there is no firm dividing line between those and phrase origins (which belong here). You can access the 1901 edition of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations at: http://www.columbia.edu/acis/bartleby/bartlett/ .
soc.culture.british
Language features peculiar to the UK get discussed in soc.culture.british as well as here. Before posting to either newsgroup on this subject, you should look at Jeremy Smith's British-American dictionary available by anonymous ftp from ftp.csos.orst.edu as pub/networking/bigfun/usuk_dictionary.txt.
alt.peeves
If you have a (language-related or other) peeve that you want to mention but don't particularly want to justify, you can try alt.peeves. ("What is your pet peeve?" is *not* a frequently asked question in alt.misc.language.english,, although some folks post unsolicited answers to it from time to time.
The Jargon File, available by anonymous ftp from:
prep.ai.mit.edu (18.71.0.38) under pub/gnu or on the WWW: http://www.ccil.org/jargon/jargon.html covers peculiarities of language as used by computer users.

WHAT IS ESL? WHAT IS EFL?


ESL is the popular shortcut term for English as a Second Language. (It is most often pronounced "EE-ES-EL" although some occasionally try to pronunce it as a n acronym, "EE-SUL".) It is normally used when referring to the teaching of English, in an English- speaking country, to people whose native language is one other than English.

EFL (pronounced "EE-FUL" is the short form corresponding to English as a Foreign Language. It is commonly used when referring to the teaching of English, in a non-English-speaking country, to people whose native language is one other than English.

ESOL (pronounced "EE-SOL") is the acronym for English to/for Speakers of Other Languages. Some prefer this term to the traditional ESL and EFL, as it takes into consideration that some learners may already speak a second language, i.e., they may be working on their third, fourth or fifth language.

IS THERE ANY DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ESL AND EFL?

The two are basically the same, however there are some differences.

EFL programs tend to have one basically homogenous group of students of the same linguistic, and cultural background (although this is not engraved in stone). Classes may be taught using both English and the native language of the students. (then again, they may be English-only, and, in some places, English classes are actually taught virtually entirely in the native language of the students!) The teachers in EFL courses may be non-native-English speakers (with command of the language varying from minimal to excellent), or they may be native speakers of English. They may be foreigners in the country in which they are teaching.

EFL is taught to people in non-English-speaking countries. The students normally study English for work purposes (or at school, or for exams, because they have no choice). Students may be studying English for the purpose of speaking with other non-native speakers. Often EFL students care little about the U.K., the U.S.A., or any other English-speaking country.

ESL programs are likely to have students from a number of different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. They tend to be taught exclusively in English (the teachers may or may not have any foreign language background), although some teachers working with homogenous groups may rely on L1 explanations.. Teachers tend to be native speakers of English (although this is by no means a hard and fast rule). ESL teachers tend to find themselves obliged to deal with cultural issues, as classes may be comprised of individuals from a number of different cultures, and many students have questions about the new culture in which they find themselves. ESL is studied by people trying to survive in a country new to them. They may often be working-class people whose aims are to deal with everyday language and sometimes with administrative issues. Many may have no previous foreign language learning experience.

Of course, there are other aspects to ESL and EFL and the differences between them. This is just a basic overview.

WHAT IS TEFL? WHAT IS TESL? WHAT IS TESOL?

TEFL ("tee-ful") is an acronym corresponding to Teaching English as a Foreign Language.

TESL ("tee-sul") is an acronym corresponding to Teaching English as a Second Language.

Both are used primarily in relation to programs involved in educating people who would like to teach English to non-English-speakers.

TESOL ("tee-sawl") is an acronym corresponding to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. It is also the name of the U.S.-based professional organization for ESL/EFL/ESOL professionals.


WHAT DOES ONE NEED TO DO TO BE AN ESL/EFL/ESOL TEACHER?


There are a number of different routes to becoming an ESL/EFL/ESOL teacher. Many people finish a Bachelor's degree and then take a special course in TESL/TEFL. Others pursue Masters' degrees in TESL/TEFL. Still others, after finishing college find positions in other countries simply on the basis of their being native English speakers with college degrees. And then, some folks go traveling and begin to teach English as a way to pick up extra funds. In areas with large immigrant communities, it is often possible to volunteer in programs set up to help immigrants. Many immigrants also find their way into "mainstream" literacy programs, which typically employ volunteers to teach the students. Many volunteers go on to become professional teachers (it's how I got started).

WHAT IS THE RSA-CAMBRIDGE C-TEFLA?

The RSA-Cambridge Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language is one form of certification of ESL/EFL/ESOL teachers which was developed in England and has spread around the world. The RSA-CTEFLA program, and others like it, offer intensive, short-term instruction in basic methodology for individuals who would like to pursue ESL/EFL/ESOL teaching jobs. The course, offered by

RSA-Cambridge TEFLA centers located around the world, is generally taken as a one-month intensive, hands-on program, with actual classroom teaching practice.

There is also a Trinity College Certificate which is widely well- received. There are about 50 centers in the U.K. which offer the Trinity Certificate.

The (fairly significant) difference between the CTEFLA and Trinity College qualifications is in the nature of the external assessment. Trinity doesn't have any, and while some centers are undoubtedly very good, a certificate from one center may carry much less "value" than from another. Cambridge/UCLES operates a system of course assessors who ensure that training standards on all courses remain at a similar level.

Additionally, there are a number of independent schools which offer their own versions of these programs, both in the U.K. and in the U.S.

HOW DOES THE C-TEFLA COMPARE WITH THE MA-TESL?

Well, to start, the C-TEFLA is a certificate program commonly administered by private educational training centers,whereas the MA-TESL is a full masters' degree program offered by universities. The C-TEFLA takes approximately one to three months to complete, while the MA-TESL takes one to two years, commonly.

The MA-TESL is recognized and sought by most university-level ESL/EFL/ESOL programs in the U.S.and around the world. The C-TEFLA seems to be mostly valued by private ESL/EFL/ESOL schools in Europe and some other locations around the world. According to one source, it is also considered a plus in combination with an MA-TESL in British universities.

There's also, of course, the cost factor. The C-TEFLA costs just under $2000 in most schools in the U.S. (as of July, 1995). There are some places in the world where it is available at a substantially lower rate. The MA-TESL runs many thousands of dollars, or whatever other currency you would be using.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES (IF ANY) TO HAVING THE RSA-CAMBRIDGE C-TEFLA?

If you have a bachelor's degree from a university in the U.S., the U.K., Ireland, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand or Canada (or any other country widely recognized as being an English-speaking country -- sorry but we're not talking world Englishes here), and you are a native English speaker, you can probably get a job teaching English in any number of places. So, why get the C-TEFLA?

Well, for starters, if you've never taught before, it's always good to have someone show you how to do it, let you practice, tell you about possible problems and ways to handle them, suggest materials, teach you some handy techniques, and tell you a bit about methodology before you actually go in front of those bright faces of your students on that first day. You're still going to have first-day jitters, but having had the opportunity to practice teach, and having a reasonable idea of how to do what you have to do will definitely take the edge off of those jitters and make you a more confident and effective teacher.

Aside from the practical teaching aspect, there is the employment issue. The British Council accepts the RSA-Cambridge certificate as professional qualification for teaching positions. So, if you have this sort of certificate/qualification, you can apply for positions through the British Council, which has offices all over the world. Many schools in Europe and other parts of the world find the RSA-Cambridge certificate very desirable -- it might give you an advantage in a competitive situation.

WHERE CAN ONE FIND OUT ABOUT C-TEFLA PROGRAMS AVAILABLE IN THE U.S. AND ABROAD?

Some RSA/Cambridge CTEFLA Schools in the USA
Center for English Studies 	               	Coast Language Academy
330 7th Avenue                  	        200 SW Marret St
New York, NY, USA                       	Suite 111
Tel:212-620-0760                          	Portland Oregon, USA 
                                                Tel:503-224-1960

English International San Francisco     St Giles Language Teaching Centre
655 Sutter St (Suite 500)               1 Hallidie Plaza (Suite 530)
San Francisco CA 94108, USA             San Francisco CA 94123, USA
Tel 415-749-5633                        415-788-3552

Coast Language Academy                  Georgetown University
501 Santa Monica Boulevard              3607 O St NW
Suite 403                               Washington DC 20007, USA
Santa Monica CA 90401, USA              202-687-4400
Tel 310-394-8618    

Oxford House College                    Eurolink Training Centres
3 Oxford St.                            3, Abbeydale Rd. South
London, W1, England                     Sheffield S7 2QL, England
0171-734-3889                           0114-262-1522
                                        fax: 0114-236-0774
                                        note: Eurolink apparently
                                        also offers a Certificate
                                        by distance education
The RSA/Cambridge Certificate TEFLA syllabus, and the list of approved training centers in the U.K. and abroad can be obtained from:
University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES)
Syndicate Buildings, 1 Hills Road
Cambridge CB1 2EU, England.
Tel (+44-1223) 553311
Fax (+44-1223) 460278

The British Council issues an information packet for prospective EFL teachers, which lists all accredited Teacher Training Centers for both the Cambridge and Trinity College qualifications. The British Council has a series of English Studies Information Sheets (ESIS), which list courses available at different levels. The English Language and Literature Department of the British Council also produces a booklet called, "Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languges: Opportunities for Professional Development. All of this information is available free of charge directly from the British Council: Write:

The British Council English Language Information Unit
10 Spring Gardens,
London, SW1A 2BN,
England.

There is also a chain of training centers, called International Language Centres Group (International House,)which has affiliates all over the world. You can get information by writing to:

International House
106 Piccadilly,
London, W1V 9FL, England
email: 100733.511@compuserve.com

or via the International House-ILC Group website:
http://www.ilcgroup.com/home.html

There is a magazine called TRANSITIONS ABROAD, in which C-TEFLA programs around the U.S. regularly advertise. TA also publishes a guide to teaching opportunities abroad, with information on training organizations. TA can be contacted at:

Transitions Abroad
18 Hulst Rd.
Amherst, MA 01004-1300
USA

WHAT ABOUT OTHER CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS?

A number of US universities offer certificate or diploma programs for people who would like to have some sort of post-graduate education or certification in TESL/TEFL but don't want to go the whole route of the MA-TESL

WHAT ABOUT DIPLOMA COURSES?

The RSA D-TEFLA is a diploma course which offers more study of methodology and also prepares one for doing teacher training. Generally, one must have completed the RSA-Cambridge C-TEFLA before embarking on the Diploma course.

Schools offering the D-TEFLA are located around the world There are schools in Argentina, Brazil, Turkey, Italy, Singapore, England and Australia, and probably in other countries as well. There is, however, apparently only one in North America, in Mexico:

Instituto Anglo Mexicano de Cultura, Guadalajara
I.A.M. AC
Sucursal Guadalajara
Apartado 1-2755
44680 Guadalajara Jalisco
Mexico

There are also post-graduate diploma courses offered by various universities throughout the U.S., the U.K. and Australia. In the U.S., these diploma courses are generally one-year (or so) stand-alone courses designed to prepare college graduates for teaching ESL/EFL/ESOL. In the U.K. and Australia, TEFL diplomas are often the first step toward an MA-TEFL (or its equivalent), with the coursework the same as that for first-year MA-TEFL students. The Diploma may be taken as a terminal degree, or students may continue on to complete the Master's program.

WHERE CAN ONE FIND OUT ABOUT MA-TESL PROGRAMS AVAILABLE?

One place to check is the Linguistic Funland TESL's Study Programs for Teachers Page: http://www.tesol.net/teslprog.teach.html.

You can check the public library for books which list Master's programs in the U.S.

There is also a list of schools which offer Master's programs by distance education at the end of this FAQ.


WHAT IS THE TOEFL? WHAT ARE THE CAMBRIDGE EXAMINATIONS? HOW DO THEY COMPARE?


The TOEFL ("toe-ful"; less commonly, "toy-ful" is a Test of English as a Foreign Language. Its purpose is to measure the English proficiency level of non-native speakers of English. The TOEFL is the examination which most universities in the United States require of prospective foreign students prior to admission. Government agencies and scholarship programs may also require the TOEFL.

The lowest TOEFL score usually accepted by good U.S. universities is 500. While the test can be taken an unlimited number of times, if more than two years have passed since one last took the TOEFL. the scores are no longer valid, and the test must be taken again.

The TOEFL consists of several sections, designed to measure different competencies. Most of these sections are multiple choice:

Listening Comprehension:
to measure ability to understand spoken English.
Structure and Written Expression:
to measure ability to recognize grammatically correct English.
Reading Comprehension:
to measure ability to understand written English.
Test of Written English (TWE):
to demonstrate ability to produce correct and meaningful written English.

Information and schedules of TOEFL testing dates and sites can be obtained by requesting the Bulleting of Information from:

TOEFL
P.O. Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151
USA

The Cambridge exams are generally considered the standard for EFL exams in Europe. The most important for most students is the First Certificate in English (FCE) which is at approximately upper intermediate level (roughly comparable to a score of 500 on the TOEFL) With this certificate, students can request a pay increase on the job in some countries. at work in some countries

The Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) is the exam which most British universities request of foreign students (It is roughly comparable to a score of 600-650 on the TOEFL). Thus it is is the goal of many European students.

The Cambridge series of exams is as follows, going from elementary to advanced:

The Key English Test (KET)
The Preliminary English Test (PET)
The First Certificate in English (FCE)
The Certificate of Advanced English (CAE)
The Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

Both the TOEFL and the Cambridge CPE test listening, reading and writing quite rigorously. (They are challenging even to native speakers). While the CPE also tests spoken English, there is a companion test - the Test of Spoken English (TSE) in the U.S. for testing spoken English. Both exams take 4-5 hours to complete.

British universities accept both the Cambridge exams and TOEFL scores as evidence of language level. U.S. universities generally require satisfactory TOEFL scores. (I don't know whether or not the CPE would be accepted in lieu of the TOEFL by U.S. universities)

One of the weaknesses of the Cambridge examinationsis that they don't expire. Once students have passed the exam, they have the qualification for life, even if they never speak a word of English again. TOEFL scores, on the other hand, become invalid two years after the test has been taken.

Information about tthe Cambridge Examinations of English can be obtained from:

The British Council English Language Information Unit
10 Spring Gardens,
London, SW1A 2BN,
England.

WHERE CAN ONE FIND OUT ABOUT EFL TEACHING JOBS IN OTHER COUNTRIES?


The New York Times often carries classified advertisements from schools in Korea and Taiwan, normally listed under TEACHER. (Other major newspapers in major ports of entry in most English-speaking countries -- as traditionally considered -- probably do, as well).. University bulletin boards often have postings from agents for various schools in various countries.

TESOL (Teachers of English as a Second Language), the professional organization for ESL/EFL/ESOL teachers in the U.S. has an employment listing. The TESL-L mailing list has a job-list on which job postings often appear. Job postings also appear from time to time on misc.education.language.english.

TRANSITIONS ABROAD publishes a guide to teaching English Abroad which gives information on placement agencies. Some placement agencies advertise in TA as well. TA can be contacted at:

Transitions Abroad
18 Hulst Rd.
Amherst, MA 01004-1300

TEACH ENGLISH ABROAD, a book by Susan Griffiths, lists long and short-term teaching assignments around the world. This book can be obtained from Vacation Work Publications, 9 Park End Street, Oxford, England, OX1 1H.

TEACHING ENGLISH ABROAD, is a publication, from Transitions Abroad Publishing, which gives country-by-country descriptions of teaching opportunities for experienced and inexperienced EFL teachers. There is also a listing of training and placement organizations and ESL teaching resources. It is available for $9.95 plus S&H.

Transitions Abroad Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 1300
Amhertst, MA 01004-1300, USA
tel: 1-800-293-0373
fax: 413-256-0373
The EFL GAZETTE publishes the ELT Guide. This guide, updated annually, gives a good introduction to TEFL qualifications, courses and career opportunities. The ad claims listings in 100 countries with over 30,000 jobs. This publication is (U.K.)11.95 (within the U.K.), (U.K.)12.95 (within the EU), and (U.K.)14.95 (for the rest of the world)
EFL Ltd.
10 Wrights Lane, Kensington,
London, W8 6TA, England
tel: +44 171 937 6506
fax: +44 171 937 7534
THE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR (TIE) is a newspaper which lists job ads for English and other subjects in international schools. It also contains information about recruitment fairs and agencies. For current information write/call/fax:
The International Educator
102A Popes Lane,
London, W5 4NS
tel/fax: 0181 840 2587
OVERSEAS JOB EXPRESS publishes job information in a monthly email newsletter called OJE-Tips. You can receive a copy of the newsletter by sending a blank Email message to OJE-tips@zoom.com.

There is a WWW site with job listings at http://www.tcom.ohiou.edu/OU_Language/teacher/job.html

OHAYO SENSEI is an Email newsletter about jobs available in Japan. Obtain a copy by sending an Email request to: ohayo.@calon.com, or read it on the web at Http://math.unr.edu/linguistics/ohayo-sensei.html.

YAHOO is a WWW search facility, at http://www.yahoo.com/search.html

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE, a group of affiliated EFL schools in 25 countries, which also administers the RSA/Cambridge C-TEFLA and D-TEFLA, assists IH graduates in obtaining international jobs in affiliate schools.

106 Piccadilly,
London W1V 9FL, http://www.u-net.com/eflweb/taiwan0.htm
England
Tel (+44-171) 491 2598,
Fax (+44-171) 495 0284
e-mail: 100645.1417@compuserve.com
Keziah Cunningham, Teacher Selection Dept.

Here are some useful links for those considering going to teach English in Taiwan, Japan.or Korea:

gopher://gopher.nectec.or.th:70/11/lists/ELTASIA-L%3A%20Englist %20Language%20Teaching%20in%20Asia

http://www.ReadersNdex.com/imprint/000000k/imprint.html

http://www.eflweb.com/experience/experience-index.htm

http://www.linguistic-funland.com/ohayo-sensei.html

http://langue.hyper.chubu.ac.jp/jacet/

http://langue.hyper.chubu.ac.jp/jalt/

http://pobox.com/~konrad/jp.html

There is some information about teaching English in various different countries on the EFL Web. You can also post a job request there. http://www.u-net.com/eflweb

JOB-FINDING AGENCIES

I've listed all the information that I have on these agencies/organizations/schools... If you want to try using any of them, do so at your own risk. As I know nothing about them, I can't take any responsibility for anything other than having listed them. Good luck. (If you have had any contact with any of them, or know of anyone who's had experience with any of them, I'd appreciate hearing from you.)

International Schools Services
PO Box 5910
Princeton NJ 08543
USA
tel: 609-452-0990
fax: 609-452-2690
they say they do not charge placement fees
Global Classroom, Inc.
3765 Motor Ave. #638
Los Angeles, CA 90034
USA
they say they offer placement for UAE, Saudi, and China. Candidates should have at least BA and 1 yr. ESL/EFL/ESOL teaching experience; MA-TESL, TEFL cert. preferred. One informant says they seem very nice and also offer placement in South American countries.
EEC (Thailand)
contact: Director of Studies
430/17-24 Soi Chula 64
Siam Square, Pathumwan,
Bangkok 10330, Thailand
Tel: 662-254-8961
Fax 662-254-8962
they say they have 30 branches country-wide. Require RSA + experience.
ESL Services
1625 Gregory St.
Ypsilanti, MI 48197
USA
tel: 313-485-1848
fax: 313-485-0213
they say they offer no-fee placement in universities and English language schools in Korea for $20,000- $25,0000 (US) with housing, airfare and health insurance. Require MA-TESOL or BA in English, Linguistics or Elementary/Secondary Ed....
Professional Training Services
Contact: Tracy Meyer,
Wisma B11
Professional Training Services
Jalan Pemoda 60-70
Surabaya, Indonesia
Tel: 031-510006
they say they accept applications year-round, $900/mo with medical insurance, free housing, 20 days paid vacation.
The Soros Foundation
Robert Hausmann, Director
Linguistics Program,
The University of Montana
Missoula, MT 59812
USA
tel: 406-243-4751
fax: 406-243-2016
email: hausmann@selway.umt.edu
they say they have positions in Albania, Bosnia Herzogovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Ukraine. The Soros Foundation gives strong preference to those with an MA degree in Applied Linguistics or related field such as TESOL, and to those who have formal training in English as a Second or Foreign Language.

WHAT ABOUT THE PEACE CORPS?

The Peace Corps remains a popular way for many people in the U.S. to go abroad, experience a new culture and teach English as a Foreign Language. The basic requirement seems to be a college degree. You can call the Peace Corps at 800-424-8580.

There are two Usenet newsgroups which deal with the Peace Corps:
alt.peace-corps
alt.peace.corps

WHAT OTHER VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS CAN ONE JOIN TO GO ABROAD AND TEACH ENGLISH WITHOUT EXPERIENCE?

Worldteach sends volunteer teachers abroad for one year terms of service.(the volunteers are expected to pay a certain fee) Worldteach can bereached at 617-495-5527. There are other programs which crop up from time to time. A good source of information on these programs is the magazine Transitions Abroad, which can be reached at the address cited above.


WHAT RESOURCES FOR ESL/EFL/ESOL TEACHERS ARE AVAILABLE ON THE INTERNET?


Well, of course, there is misc.education.language.english.

NOTE: Where descriptions have been given, they are included. (My access is limited to text-only, so I browse/have browsed the WWW sites lightly, but I haven't dwelt there.)

NEWSGROUPS

bit.listserv.tesl-l (which is a redistribution of a BITNET mailing list -- not all machines on Usenet carry these) is also a discussion of TESL/FL. It is a moderated discussion and to participate you must first subscribe to theTESL-L mailing list.

bit.listserv.slart-l (which is a redistribution of a BITNET mailing list -- not all machines on Usenet carry these) is also a discussion of TESL/FL.

comp.edu.languages.natural is devoted to software for assisting language instruction.

k12.ed.business Business education curriculum in grades K-12.

k12.ed.comp.literacy Teaching computer literacy in grades K-12.

k12.lang.art The art of teaching reading, writing, literature, English grammar, and composition in grades K-12.

k12.chat.teacher: For teachers of grades K-12.

alt.education.email-project

MAILING LISTS There are also several lists which focus on ESL/EFL/ESOL.

NETEACH-L is a mailing list concerned with electronic ESL teaching. Subscribe by sending a message (without a signature) to listserv@thecity.sfsu.edu the message should read subscribe NETEACH-L Firstname Lastname

TESL-L is a moderated mailing list populated by thousands of ESL/EFL/ESOL professionals. Subscribe by sending an email to LISTSERV@CUNYVM.CUNY.EDU with a blank subject line. In the body of the message, write:
SUBSCRIBE TESL-L FIRSTNAME LASTNAME
where firstname is your first name and lastname is your last name. Use all caps. TESL-L also has a number of sublists, which can be subscribed to similarly once you've subscribed to TESL-L.

TESP-L is a list for English for Special Purposes /Vocational ESL
TESLMW-L is a list for materials writers
TESLIT-L is a list for those working with literacy issues
TESLIE-L is a list primarily for administrators of IEP's
TESLCA-L is a list concerned with computer-assisted learning in ESL/EFL/ESOL
TESLJB-L is a list concerned with job listings and job seekers

EST-L is a mailing list for teachers of English for Science and Technology. Subscribe by sending an email message with a blank subject line to LISTSERV@ASUVM.INRE.ASU.EDU In the body of the messaage write:
SUB EST-L FIRSTNAME LASTNAME
where firstname is your first name and lastname is your last name

CTESL-L: An International online fellowship for Christians who teach ESL.
To subscribe just email to the Mail-Server: Mail-Server@rhesys.mb.ca
Enter in the message area: Subscribe ctesl-l

ESLCC (English as a Second Language at the Community Colleges)
(In spite of its name, which is the same as the address from which this message is coming, this list is NOT a TESL-L branch). To subscribe to the eslcc list, send the following command to eslcc-request@hcc.hawaii.edu
in the body of e-mail: subscribe eslcc

GLESOL-L
Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Educators of English to Speakers of Other Languages (and their friends) The purpose of this discussion group is to foster serious dialog and exchange of Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual issues in the field of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. To sign up for GLESOL-L, send an e-mail to: mailserv@uni.edu
In the body of the message, type the following:
subscribe glesol-l

***Disclaimer: Participation in this discussion is not to be construed as an indication of a participant's sexual orientation.

LINGUIST
Write to LISTSERV@TAMVM1.TAMU.EDU
subscribe LINGUIST first-name last-name
Example: Sub LINGUIST Alexander Magnus

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION list.
To subscribe, enter only the following command in the BODY of your e-mail message:
Sub Mult-Cul real name
This command should be sent to: Listserv@ubvm.cc.buffalo.edu

SLART-L Second Language Acquisition, Research, and Teaching
Send a message to LISTSERV@CUNYVM.CUNY.EDU
In the body of the message, type: SUB SLART-L first-name last-name
Example: SUB SLART-L Jeanne d'Arc

LATTICE, the Language and Technology Centre of the National Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia, for language, literacy and linguistics specialists, based at the University of Queenland in Brisbane, Australia, provides a home for several linguistics-related lists.
To subscribe to the lists, send an email message with a blank subject line to: majordomo@cltr.uq.oz.au
The body of the message should read: subscribe [name of list]

The lists are:
APPLIX. A discussion group for people interested in applied linguistics.
ATELL. A discussion group for people interested in computer- assisted language learning.

WEBSITES

There are also numerous WWW sites available for ESL/EFL/ESOL professionals and students alike. For those with only email access to the Internet: WWW is available to you, too. According to information at: you can send email to: agora@www.undp.org with a blank subject line and a message reading: www URL where "URL" is the URL you want to look at. You can request more than one URL at a time, by putting each URL on a separate line with "www" (minus the quotation marks) at the start of each line.

The Comenius Group: http://www.comenius.com

EFLWeb: http://www.pacificnet.net/~sperling/eslcafe.html
ESL Idea Page: http://www.pacificnet.net/~sperling/ideas.html
ESL Email Connection for ESL/EFL Students http://www.pacificnet.net/~sperling/student.html

Virtual Catalog: http://www.pvp.com/esl.htm

Virtual CALL Library, the Language Center at the University of Sussex,(England): http://www.sussex.ac.uk/langc/welcome.html

Ohio University: http://www.tcom.ohiou.edu/OU_Language/english/index.html

YAHOO: http://dir.yahoo.com/Social_Science/Linguistics_and_Human_Languages/Languages/Specific_Languages/English/English_as_a_Second_Language/

Lingnet: http://www.lingnet.org

Linguistic Funland TESL: http://www.linguistic-funland.com/tesl.html
Try also http://www.linguistic-funland.com/linguistic.funland.html .

Frizzy University Network (FUN): http://thecity.sfsu.edu/~funweb

TESL-EJ Electronic Journal:
http://www-writing.berkeley.edu/TESL-EJ/

Oxford University Language Center: http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/

LINGUIST: http://www.emich.edu/~linguist/issues/html/

LATTICE:: http://www.cltr.uq.oz.au/

Washington & Lee University: http://liberty.uc.wlu.edu/~hblackme/newhome/langd.html

English for Science and Technology: http://www.wfi.fr/est/.

ESL Exchange: http://www.ed.uiuc.edu

Agora Newsletter: http://www.agoralang.com:2410/agoranews_current

National Center for Adult Literacy: href="http://litserver.literacy.upenn.edu

Internet Directory of LIteracy & Adult Education Resources: http://www.cybernetics.net/users/sagrelto/elandh/home.htm

Washington & Lee University: http://liberty.uc.wlu.edu/~hblackme/newhome/langd.html

University of Wisconsin: http://polyglot.lss.wisc.edu/lss/lang/nflrc.html

CELIA: ESL Shareware: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/www/education/celia/celia.htmlMbr>

CELIA Student Lists: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/www/education/sl/sl.html

Volterre-Fr: http://www.wfi.fr/volterre/home.html

OnLine Educator: http://www.cris.com/~felixg/OE/OEWELCOME.html

Business English: http://www.lydbury.co.uk/besig/

Composition Course Database: http://moo.du.org:8888/00anon/cybercomp

Professor Arthur Miller's Courtroom Challenge. (Real U.S.Supreme Court cases.): http://www.courttv.com/cases

E-Mail Pen-pal info:

FLES homepage: http://www.public.iastate.edu/~egarcia/fles.html. check the U.S. Dept of Education link for examples and descriptions of e-mail exchange programs. check the EDWEB link resources for K-12 teachers.

South Australian Teaching and Curriculum Centre of the National Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia (NLLIA),in Adelaide, South Australia.(applied linguistics research and teacher professional development in second language acquisition,bilingual education, indigenous languages and literacy issues, language policy, language teaching resources, child literacy and ESOL): http://203.17.136.22/public/nllia_satcc/nllia-satcc.html

The TESL-L archives have three files listing additional websites. To access these files, you must first be subscribed to the TESL-L and TESLCA-L mailing lists. To order send an email message to LISTSERV@CUNYVM.CUNY.EDU with the following command(s).in the body of the message:

GET WEBSITES TESL TESL-L F=MAIL
GET WEBSITES LANGLING TESL-L F=MAIL
GET WEBSITES MORE TESL-L F=MAIL

WORLD WIDE WEB SEARCH ENGINES

If you're looking for something on the Internet (WWW or Usenet newsgroups), search engines can help you to find it.

Yahoo Directory ( http://www.yahoo.com/ or under the Net Directory button on Netscape). Yahoo searches Web titles, URLs and comments. By selecting options, you can make your search case sensitive, choose between searching for any or all of your keywords, and look for substrings or complete words. Or, if you prefer, you can "surf" through Yahoo's pre-selected categories (e.g., arts, education, entertainment, science) to see if you find anything interesting.

Infoseek Search (http://www2.infoseek.com/ or under the Net Search button on Netscape). Searches Web pages around the world. Choose special query operators or helpful tips to get a broad list of special options. Results limited to 10 matches (there is an associated commercial service which allows larger numbers of matches.) Results also include a paragraph of comments on each match.

Lycos (http://www.lycos.com. or under the Net Search button on Netscape). The big Lycos catalog searches 5.6 million web pages. A second smaller catalogue searches 486,000 pages. A good feature of Lycos is that it will rank the search results in order depending on how many times your key words appear in the documents. Click on search language help to see a number of options.

Web Crawler (http://webcrawler.com/ or under the Net Search button on Netscape). Searches through 1.5 million documents. Options are limited to the number of results requested and choosing between any or all keywords.

Altavista: http://www.altavista.digital.com
A search tool developed by Digital with a database of over 16,000,000 web pages and 13,000 Usenet newsgroups. Alta Vista will query both the Web and Usenet newsgroups. Some other notable features of Alta Vista are:

  • Boolean searching with AND, OR, NOT and NEAR operators
  • Case-sensitive and quoted-string searching
  • Ability to search on portions of a URL

TELNET SITES:

DEFENSE LANGUAGE INSTITUTE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CENTER: lingnet.army.mil

LATTICE Databases: lingua.cltr.uq.oz.au
. Log in as dbguest, using the password is NLLIA-db Make sure that your terminal type is set to VT100.

ESL MOO

SchMOOze University: http://schmooze.hunter.cuny.edu:8888/

GOPHER SITES:

NOTE: Many gophers are liinked together. Once at one gopher, you can often connect to others in your interest area. Don't be afraid to explore.

Ask ERIC: gopher://ericir.syr.edu

CUNYGopher: TESL: gopher://CUNYVM.CUNY.EDU:70/11/Subject%20Specific%20Gophers
choose Teaching English as a second or Foreign Language

CELIA (Computer Enhanced Language Instruction Archive): gopher://gopher.latrobe.edu.au

Comenius Gopher: gopher://gopher.comenius.com

Agora Language Marketplace: gopher://gopher.agoralang.com:2411

FOR STUDENTS OF ESL

In addition to the above mentioned WWW sites, which offer quite a bit for ESL students, as well as teachers, there are a number of EMail mailing-lists which are primarily for students of ESL.

CHAT-SL General Discussion List (Low Level)
DISCUSS-SL General Discussion List (High Level)
BUSINESS-SL Discussion List on Business and Economics
ENGL-SL Discussion List on Learning English
EVENT-SL Discussion List on Current Events
MOVIE-SL DiscussionList on the Cinema
MUSIC-SL Discussion List on Music
SCITECH-SL DiscussionList on Science, Technology & Computers
SPORT-SL Discussion List on Sports
To subscribe to any of these lists, send a message to :
majordomo@latrobe.edu.au saying
subscribe XXXX-SL
(where XXXX-SL is the desired list name)

For further information please send a blank message to: announce-sl@latrobe.edu.au


INTERNET EDUCATION


For those who would like to expand their understanding of the Internet and all it offers, the Roadmap lessons, available by email, offer a free, user-friendly method of becoming accustomed to using the Internet in its various aspects. To obtain the syllabus for the Roadmap lessons, send an email message with a blank subject line to:
LISTSERV@UA1VM.UA.EDU
In the body of the message write:
GET ROADMAP SYLLABUS F=MAIL

This will fetch you a listing of the Roadmap lessons and what they contain, as well as instructions as to how to obtain the lessons via email.

ESL/EFL/ESOL ORGANIZATIONS

TESOL, Inc. (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages)
1600 Cameron Street, Suite 300
Alexandria, Virginia 22314-2751 USA
Tel. 703-836-0774 - Fax 703-836-7864
email: mbr@TESOL.EDU
IATEFL (International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language)
3 Kingsdown Chambers
Tankerton, Whitstable
Kent,England CT5 2DJ
tel +44 227 276528
fax +44 227 274415
email: 100070.1327@Compuserve.com
MATSDA (Materials Development Association)
A professional association for materials developers.
MATSDA Membership includes:
Free MATSDA Journal, FOLIO (twice a year)
Reduced conference fees (twice a year)
Reduced workshop fees
Eligibility for MATSDA support
[Membership fees - as of January, 1995]
Individual #30
Full-time Student #10
Overseas #15 + #5 (postage)
Institutional #100 (up to four unnamed members)
Method of Payment (made payable to MATSDA)
Cheque in Sterling
International Money Order
contact:
Cristina S. Banfi,
Secretary of MATSDA,
Queens9 College,
Cambridge CB3 9ET, UK.
Tel: +44-1223-574883
Fax: +44-(0)1223-335522
e-mail: cristina@ling.ucl.ac.uk
UCLES (Examination board for RSA/Cambridge Cert. and Dip. TEFL courses)
University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate
Syndicate Buildings,
1 Hills Road, Cambridge CB1 2EU,
England
Tel (+44-1223) 553311,
Fax (+44-1223) 460278,
Telex 94012736 SYND G
OUDLE/AET (Examination board for Oxford/ARELS EFL exams)
Oxford University Delegacy of Local Examinations / ARELS Examinations Trust
Ewert House,
Ewert Place,
Summertown,
Oxford OX2 7BZ,
UK
Tel (+44-1865) 54291,
Fax (+44-1865) 510085
Don Malpass, Director; Elizabeth Lowen, Sec.
Educational Solutions (info about the Silent Way approach developed by Caleb Gattegno)
99 University Place
New York, NY, 10011
USA,
tel. 212-674-2988.

BOOKS FOR TEACHING ESL


GRAMMAR AND TOEFL REVIEW

Betty Schrampf Azar, UNDERSTANDING AND USING ENGLISH GRAMMAR

Raymond Murphy, GRAMMAR IN USE: Reference and Practice for Intermediate Students of English, Cambridge University Press, 1989

ALL PURPOSE BOOKS

Raymond Clark, Patrick Moran, Arthur Burrows, ESL MISCELLANY, Pro Lingua Associates, 1991 If you could only take one book with you to that teaching job wherever, if you only had one book to use, I would vote for this one. ESL Miscellany covers grammar, has extensive lists of words by subject, spelling rules,maps, signs, famous American speeches and songs, descriptions of he U.S. overnment, U.S. history, and on and on.

COMMUNICATION/CONVERSATION/ACTIVITIES BOOKS

Friederike Klippel, KEEP TALKING, Cambridge University Press,1984. This book has all kinds of games/activities/project to get students talking, in airs or groups. It is organized by type of activity (warm-up activities,question activities, discussion games, and so on)

Penny Ur, FIVE-MINUTE ACTIVITIES, Cambridge University Press. As its title suggests, this is a book filled with activities to fill five minutes.

Penny Ur, GRAMMAR PRACTICE ACTIVITIES, Cambridge University Press. Organized by grammar point, this book is a handy compendium of activities nd games which can be used to reinforce the grammar point being studied.

Leo Jones and Victoria Kimbrough, GREAT IDEAS Student's Book, Cambridge University Press, 1987 Great Ideas contains a multitude of listening and speaking activities/games/projects, based on the 1984 British text, Ideas, by Leo Jones

Fred Ligon & Elizabeth Tannenbaum, PICTURE STORIES: LANGUAGE AND LITERACY ACTIVITIES FOR BEGINNERS, Longman. Picture stories around which all sorts of activities can be organized, with a little imagination. Includes teacher's notes with little helpful cultural notes.

Rooks, CAN'T STOP TALKING

Rooks, NON-STOP DISCUSSION BOOK, Newbury House

Nancy Ellen Zelman, CONVERSATION INSPIRATIONS FOR ESL, Prolingua Associates (800-366-4775)

Christopher Sion, ed., RECIPES FOR TIRED TEACHERS, Addison Wesley Publishing Co. 1 Jacob Way, Reading, MA 01867-9984, USA

Mario Rinvolucri, GRAMMAR GAMES

Stempleski, Rice, Falsetti, GETTING TOGETHER: AN ESL CONVERSATION BOOK, Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich. Julie says it is really good.

Ann Bourman, 61 COOPERATIVE LEARNING ACTIVITIES: THINKING, WRITING, AND SPEAKING SKILLS, J. Weston Wallach. This book is supposed to be for grades 6-9 but it has all sorts of interesting activities that can be used for teenagers and adults as well. All the exercises are designed as reproducible handouts.

Jan Gaston, CULTURAL AWARENESS TEACHING TECHNIQUES, ProLingua Associates. Classroom activities for teaching/improving cultural awareness.

Malcolm Goodale, MEETINGS: TEN SIMULATIONS ON INTERNATIONAL TOPICS, LTP (Language Teaching Publications). material for pro/con debates , background reading, and more.

VOCABULARY/SPELLING

Patrick R. Moran, LEXICARRY: AN ILLUSTRATED VOCABULARY BUILDER FOR SECOND LANGUAGES, ProLingua Associates. This book has lists and lists of vocabulary items to go with clever conversation-inspiring pictures which have no words. Although it is billed as a vocabulary book, there are dozens of ways this book could be used in different activities.for various learning purposes. The author suggests a few.

H. Elaine Kirn, BASIC EVERYDAY SPELLING WORKBOOK: PATTERNS AND PRINCIPLES IN ENGLISH SPELLING, National Textbook Company. A good basic spelling book in the style of Dr. Spello (which I can't seem to find anymore), with lots of pictures and lots of exercises to drill the different spellings/sounds of English words.

Raymond C. Clark & Janie L. Duncan, GETTING A FIX ON VOCABULARY, ProLingua Associates. A high-intermediate/advanced book using short news and human interest stories to teach vocabulary construction with prefixes and suffixes.

LISTENING COMPREHENSION/DICTATION

John McClintock & Borje Stern, LISTEN UP!, Heinemann. Pictures and multiple choice exercises for use with tapescripts cnveniently located in the back of the book, along with teacher's notes and an answer key. There's apparently a tape available for this book as well.

Paul Davis & Mario Rinvolucri, DICTATION: NEW METHODS, NEW POSSIBILITIES, Cambridge University Press. Different ways to handle dictation.

BASIC TEXTS/SURVIVAL ENGLISH

John Walsh, BASIC ADULT SURVIVAL ENGLISH: PART ONE, Prentice Hall Regents. Short readings and grammar activities which step through grammar points and present useful basic information for managing life in living in the United States.

CULTURE TEXTS (U.S. CULTURE)

Gary Althen, AMERICAN WAYS, , Intercultural Press, 1988 is my favorite. It looks at the U.S. from the standpoint of an international student.

Edward N. Kearny, THE AMERICAN WAY, , Prentice-Hall, 1984, which is useful in a classroom situation, even with Americans! It illustrates cross-cultural aspects as well.

Milada Broukal & Peter Murphy, INTRODUCING THE USA: A CULTURAL READER. Longman. Simple stories about different aspects of the United States, its famous places, famous people and cultural ways.

K-12

Jim Cummins and Dennis Sayers, BRAVE NEW SCHOOLS: CHALLENGING CULTURAL ILLITERACY THROUGH GLOBAL LEARNING NETWORKS, St. Martin's Press Lists Internet resources in the areas of parental involvement, multicultural education, bilingualism, second language acquisition, special education, and all the subject areas There is also information on ways to organize partner class exchanges.

Gail Junion-Metz, K-12 RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET Explains ways teachers and librarians take advantage of the Internet. Available from Library Solutions Institute Press, Publications Sales Office, 1100 Industrial Road, Suite 9, San Carlos CA 94070; tel: 510-841-2636; email: sales@library-solutions.com Web: http://www.internet-is.com/library/

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Peter Wilberg, ONE TO ONE: A TEACHER'S HANDBOOK, Language Teaching Publications. Practical guide for teaching one-on-one.

Patricia Byrd, ed., MATERIALS WRITER'S GUIDE, Heinle & Heinle. For those days when you think about that book you could write if you only had the time. Read and write!

Carolyn Graham, SINGING, CHANTING, TELLING TALES,: ARTS IN THE LANGUAGE CLASSROOM. Prentice Hall Regents. .Tips on producing original jazz chants to teach specific points,and using poetry and songs in the classroom.

Raymond C. Clark, LANGUAGE TEACHING TECHNIQUES, ProLingua Associates. This is an older text of tried but true techniques for teaching language in the classroom.

Jim Scrivener, LEARNING TEACHING the standard course book for the CTEFLAcourse at International House, Hastings, and being increasingly adopted at other RSA/Cambridge centers.

Tim Bowen & Jonathan Marks, INSIDE TEACHING. recommended reading for candidates for DTEFLA course at International House


ESL/EFL/ESOL BOOK PUBLISHERS AND DISTRIBUTORS


ADDISON-WESLEY PUBLISHING COMPANY
World Language Division
10 Bank Street
White Plains, NY 10606-1951
USA
1-800-266-8855 Ext.5177
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
40 West 20th Street
New York, NY 10011-4211
1-800-872-7423
in Canada:
Pippin Publishing Ltd.
380 Esna Park Drive
Markham, Ontario L3R IH5
Canada
(416) 513-6966
1-800-567-6591
fax: (416) 513-6977
outside North America
Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building
Shaftsbury Road
Cambridge CB2 2RU
England
telephone: (0223) 312393
fax: (0223) 315052

CONTEMPORARY BOOKS, INC.
2 Prudential Plaza, Suite 1200
180 North Stetson Ave.
Chicago, IL 60601-6790
USA
telephone: 1-800-621-1918
fax: (802) 257-5117
HARCOURT BRACE & COMPANY
6277 Sea Harbor Drive
Orlando, FL
USA
1-800-742-5375
fax 407-352-3445 or 1-800-874-6418
HEINEMANN ELT
http://www.heinemann.co.uk/heinemann/elt/intro.html
HEINLE & HEINLE PUBLISHERS
20 Park Plaza
Boston, MA 02116
USA
telephone 1-800-237-0053
fax: (617) 451-1940
http://www.heinle.com/

In Canada
Nelson Canada
1120 Birchmount Road
Scarborough, Ontario
M1K5G4
fax: (415) 752-9646
LONGMAN
10 Bank Street
White Plains, NY 10606
USA
MCGRAW-HILL, INC.
1221 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10020
USA
telephone: 1-800-624-7294
NATIONAL TEXTBOOK COMPANY
4255 West Touhy Avenue
Lincolnwood, IL 60646-1975
USA
telephone:
1-800-323-4900
(708) 679-5500
fax: (708) 679-2494
email: NTCPUB2@AOL.COM
NEWBURY HOUSE
Rowley, MA 01969
USA
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
198 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4314
USA
telephone: 1-800-451-7556
fax: (919) 677--1303
PROLINGUA ASSOCIATES
15 Elm Street
Brattleboro, VT 05301
USA
telephone: 1-800-366-4775
fax: (802) 257-5117
ST. MARTIN'S PRESS
257 Park Ave South
New York NY 10010
USA
ALTA ESL BOOK CENTER PUBLISHERS
14 Adrian Court
Burlingame, CA 94010
USA
Telephone: 1-800-ALTA-ESL
Fax: 1-800-ALTA-FAX
DELTA PUBLISHING CO.
1400 Miller Parkway
McHenry, IL 60050-7030
telephone: 1-800-323-8270
In Illinois (815)-363-3582
fax: (815)-363-2948
INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE CENTRES GROUP
(International House)
http://www.ilcgroup.com/home.html
MEP SCHOOL DIVISION
MIDWESTERN EUROPEAN PUBLICATIONS, INC.
8220 N. Christiana Ave.
Skokie, IL 60076-2911
Customer Service: 708-676-1199
Fax: 708--676-1195

JOURNALS FOR ESL/EFL/ESOL PROFESSIONALS


AUSTRALIAN LANGUAGE MATTERS

ALM is a small quarterly, coordinated by the National Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia, Ltd. which covers developments in and information on language and literacy issues in Australia. There are also articles on general language and literacy issues, conference news , and book reviews For a free sample copy send a request to:

Australian Language Matters,
c/o NLLIA,
6 Campion Street,
Deakin ACT 2600,
Australia.

COMPUTER ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING

An International Journal Subscription requests:

Intellect Books, Suite 2,
108/110 London Road,
Oxford, OX3 9AW,
U.K.
outside Europe:
Ablex Publishing Corporation,
355 Chestnut Street,
New Jersey 07648
U.S.A.
editorial submissions should be sent to:
Dr Keith Cameron (General Editor),
Computer Assisted Language Learning,
Queen's Building,
The University,
EXETER, EX4 4QH, (UK)
email: CAMERON@EXETER.AC.UK

CALL periodicals and journals: The latest version of the list of CALL journals and periodicals can be obtained by sending an email message to:
LISTSERV@CC1.KULEUVEN.AC.BE
with the following command in the body of the message:
SEND JOURNALS TXT

EL GAZETTE (formerly The EFL Gazette)
A monthly newspaper, with worldwide ELT news, gossip and advertisements.

Annual subscriptions of 12 issues from:

10 Wrights Lane
Kensington, London, W8 6TA,
Great Britain
Tel (+1-171) 938 1818,
Fax (+1-171) 937 7534
e-mail: 100130.2037@compuserve.com
Damian Wilson, Editor
Dan Ward, Executive Editor.

ELT JOURNAL
ELT Journal
Journals Subscriptions Dept.
Oxford University Press,
Pinkhill House
Southfield Road, Eynsham,
Oxford OX8 1JJ
England.
outside the UK and Europe
ELT Journal
c/o Virgin Mailing and Distribution
Building 150
Newark Airport
New Jersey 07114
USA
Ther are reduced rates for TESOL and IATEFL members. Normal rate is listed as 40 dollars (outside of the UK and Europe).

THE ENGLISH TEACHING FORUM
distributed abroad by American embassies. Questions about subscriptions should be addressed to In the more than 140 other countries where the "Forum" is distributed, questions regarding subscriptions should be addressed to the Cultural Affairs Office of the United States Information Service located in the national capital.

In the United States subscriptions are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.

ESP JOURNAL

Pergamon Press
660 White Plains Road
Tarrytown
NY 10591-5153
Internet: PPI@pergamon.com
Rate $49/year

FOLIO is the journal of MATSDA.
FOLIO, published twice yearly provides a forum for discussion of issues relating to Materials Development for the teaching of Second and foreign languages, e.g,research into the effects of different kinds of teaching and materials; critical studies of present materials; and evaluations of innovative materials

Cristina S. Banfi,
Secretary of MATSDA,
Queens9 College,
Cambridge CB3 9ET, UK.
Tel: +44-1223-574883
Fax: +44-(0)1223-335522
e-mail: cristina@ling.ucl.ac.uk
HANDS-ON ENGLISH
The audience of Hands-On English is ESL teachers working with adult students, including part-timers and volunteers. Some are experienced professionals and some are not.
Anna Silliman
Hands-on English
PO Box 256
Crete, NE 68333
email: 73651.1122@compuserve.com
Tel: 1-800-ESL-HAND
FAX 402-826-3997
Each year, Hands-on English awards ten Minigrants of up to $100 each, for the development of classroom projects. The purpose of the grants is to give classroom practitioners some encouragement, recognition, and experience in applying for funding. Although Hands-on English is oriented toward Adult ESL teaching, it is not necessary to be working with this populationin order to apply. The deadline for applications is April 30, 1994.

IDEAL JOURNAL
Issues and Developments in English and Applied Linguistics A forum for research into the acquisition and teaching of ESL

IDEAL
Wayne Dickerson Editor
DEIL, 3070 FLB, UIUC
707 South Mathews
Urbana, IL 61801 USA
tel. 217-333-1506

IDIOM
Idiom is a quarterly publication of New York State TESOL. Idiom:

Jan Hayneman
157 Benton St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14620
phone/fax 716 473-0746

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND DISABILITIES
A quarterly electronic journal devoted to all aspects of computer use by persons with disabilities. Individual subscriptions are free of charge. 1) BY EMAIL:
send an e-mail message with the subject line blank to:
listserv@sjuvm.stjohns.edu
and the following command in the body of the message
sub itd-jnl Firstname Lastname

2) BY GOPHER:
To receive each issue's TABLE OF CONTENTS ONLY: send an email message wtih the subject line blank to:
listserv@sjuvm.stjohns.edu
in the body of the message sent the command:
sub itd-toc Firstname Lastname

The Table of Contents will provide abstracts of articles as well as explicit instructions for accessing Information Technology and Disabilities by gopher.

JAPAN ASSOCIATION FOR LANGUAGE TEACHING (JALT) JOURNAL

JALT Central Office
Glorious Tokyo 301
2-32-10 Nishi-Nippori
Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116
Japan
Fax number is 81-3-3802-7122.

JOURNAL OF IMAGINATION IN LANGUAGE LEARNING

The Journal of the Imagination in Language Learning
Grossnickle Hall, Room 347
Jersey City State College
2039 Kennedy Boulevard
Jersey City, New Jersey 07305-1597

JOURNAL OF INTENSIVE LANGUAGE STUDIES

JIES
Center for ESL
CESL 100- Bldg. # 24
Univ. of Arizona
Tucson AZ 85721 USA
(602) 621-1362
fax: 602-621-9180

JOURNAL OF SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING

Journal of Second Language Writing
ABLEX Publishing Corporation
355 Chestnut Street, Norwood, NJ 07648
(201) 767-8450
For information on editorial matters, contact:
Ilona Leki
Department of English
University of Tennessee 37996-0430
(615) 974-7080 or (615) 974-5401
e-mail: leki@utkvx.utk.edu
or
Tony Silva
Deparment of English
Purdue University
West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-1356
(317) 494-3769
e-mail: silvat@mace.cc.purdue.edu

LANGUAGE QUARTERLY
For subscription details, please send street mailing address to: adderley@quijote.lang.usf.edu

ON-CALL
For information or subscriptions:

ON-CALL
Language and Applied Linguistics
Bond University
Gold Coast, Queensland 4229
Australia
Phone: +61-75-95-2530
Fax: +61-75-95-2530
E-mail: On_Call@Bond.edu.au

MODERN ENGLISH TEACHER

Macmillan (U.K.)
MET
Houndmills
Basingstoke
Hants. RG21 2XS England
FAX: +1 (0)256 819210

SECOND LANGUGAGE INSTRUCTION/ACQUISITION ABSTRACTS
SLI/AA includes sections on Non-native Language Pedagogy, Non-native Language Acquisition, Language Testing, Reading Instruction and Remediation, Reading Processes, Writing, Bilingualism/Bilingual Education, and Translation.

Second Language Instruction/Acquisition Abstracts
P. O. Box 22206,
San Diego, CA 92192-0206
Email: SOCIO@SDSC.BITNET
Telephone: (619) 695-0416

TESOL JOURNAL and NEWSLETTERS
Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Membership in TESOL includes a choice of refereed publications. and special interest groups.

TESOL QUARTERLY,
TESOL JOURNAL,
TESOL MATTERS
Special Interest Sections
Adult Education
Applied Linguistics
Bilingual Education
Computer-Assisted Language Learning
Elementary Education
English as a Foreign Language
English for Specific Purposes
Higher Education
Intensive English Programs
International Teaching Assistants
Materials Writers
Program Administration
Refugee Concerns
Research
Secondary Schools
Teacher Education
Teaching English to Deaf Students
Video

For information about TESOL membership:
email: mbr@TESOL.EDU

WATESOL JOURNAL:

WATESOL Journal
Christine Meloni, WJ Editor
Program in EFL
Academic Center, T-604
George Washington University
Washington, DC 20052
Email: Christine Meloni: ADRIANO@GWUVM.BITNET

WORLD ENGLISHES
Requests for information or subscriptions should be sent to:

World Englishes
Journals Subscriptions Department
Marston Book Services
PO Box 87
Oxford OD2 0DT, England


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION


SOME UNIVERSITIES WITH MA-TESOL PROGRAMS
(not a comprehensive list)

Boston University, Boston, MA, USA
School of International Training, Brattleboro, VT, USA
Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA
University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Eastern Michigan University, MI, USA
Fairleigh Dickinson University, Teaneck NJ/Madison, NJ, USA
Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY, USA
San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA
University of Maryland, Baltimore Campus, Baltimore, MD, USA
University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

for a list of uk universities: http://www.niss.ac.uk/education/hefce/index.html


UNIVERSITIES AND TRAINING CENTERS OFFERING DISTANCE MA-TESL AND POST-GRADUATE CERTIFICATE AND DIPLOMA COURSES.


ASTON UNIVERSITY (IN BIRMINGHAM)
Degree: MSc in TESP; MSc in TESP or TE by Distance Learning Advanced Certificate in Principles of TEFL (by D L) Certificate in Principles of TESP (by DL)
Language Studies Unit
Aston University
Aston Triangle
Birmingham B4 7ET United Kingdom
tel: +44 21 359 3611 X4242
fax: +44 21 359 2725
email: lsu@aston.ac.uk
http://www.aston.ac.uk/home.html

University of Birmingham: http://www.bham.ac.uk/

EUROLINK
Degree: Cert.(TM)TESOL; ACP(TESOL); Dip.(TESOL); Licenciate Diploma
Write to:

Eurolink Distance Training Center (Dep. BBC)
3, Abbeydale Road South, Millhouses
Sheffield S7 2QL United Kingdom
tel: +44 114 2621 522
fax: +44 114 2360 774

HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY (EDINBURGH)

Moray House Institute of Education
Scottish Centre for International Education
fax 44(0) 131 557 5138
MA in TESOL (by distance learning)
Write to: The Director
Scottish Centre for International Education
Moray House Institute of Education
Heriot-Watt University
Holyrood Road
Edinburgh EH8 8AQ United Kingdom
Fax: 44(0) 131-557 5138

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
RSA/Cambridge C-TEFLA and D-TEFLA by distance

International House
106 Picadilly,
London, W1V 9FL
England
email: 100733.511@compuserve.com

LONDON UNIVERSITY
MA in TESOL by distance (computer conferencing) Institute of Education
Dept of English for Speakers of English of Other Languages

Write to: Anita Pincas
20 Bedford Way
London WC1H OAL United Kingdom
fax: +44 171 612 6534
email: a.pincas@ioe.ac.uk

MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY
MEd in Educational Technology and TESOL
MEd in TESOL, Postgrad Diploma in TESOL

Write to: The Secretary
CELSE
School of Education
University of Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester M13 9PL United Kingdom
tel: +44 161 275-3467
fax: +44 161 275-3480

MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY
Sydney, Australia
Write: David Hall: dhall@NCELTR.NCELTR.MQ.EDU.AU>

UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE LANGUAGE CENTRE
Degree: MA in TESOL (Media Technology; CALL)

Write to: The Director
The Language Centre
University of Newcastle
Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU United Kingdom
tel: +44 191 222 7535
fax: +44 191 222 5239

OXFORD HOUSE COLLEGE (Trinity College London)
Degree: Licenciate Diploma in TESOL for native and non-native speakers

Write to: Oxford House College
Diplma Enquiries (BBC)
28 Market Place
London WIN 7AL
UK
fax: +44 (0) 171 323 4582

SHEFFIELD UNIVERSITY
Dept of Education
MEd or Diploma by distance learning in Education and ELT

fax 44 (0)114 2728014
email pg.admissions@sheffield.ac.uk

UNIVERSITY OF SURREY
English Language Institute
PG Diploma or MA in Applied Linguistics (TESOL)

Write to: Dr. G. Fulcher
English Language Institute
University of Surrey
Guildford GU2 5XH United Kingdom
tel: 01843 259910 (from the U.K.)
44 1483 259910 (international)
fax: 01483 259507 (from the U.K.)
44 1483 259507 (international)
email: eli@surrey.ac.uk

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